Your Right to Practice

Your Right to Practice


Your have the right to practice


You have the right to have a personal practice 


You have the right to practice.


You have the right to practice embodying well-being.


You have the right to practice enjoying being in your body.


You have the right to practice enhancing your sexual energy.


You have the right to practice discovering yourself anew.


You have the right to practice - period!




You have the right to practice somatic exercises for the purpose of getting more in touch with your body senses and feelings


You have the right to practice somatic exercises as a way of getting to know who you are on a basic somatic level, as a living body.  



You have the right to practice taking the time you need to practice. 


You have the right to take all the time you need to get more in touch with your body, your mind, your emotions & feelings, and your soul --- your whole self.


You have the right to take all the time you need to practice somatic exercises and study somatic books for greater depth of understanding.


You have the right to take all the time you need to inform yourself on what you need to know to become a more embodied being.


You have the right to take the time to simply “do nothing” --- time out


You have the right to practice when you want and for as long as want. 



You have the right to create whatever space you need to practice.


You have the right to create whatever space you need in your life so you can practice.


You have the right to create space within yourself --- psychically/mentally, emotionally.   


You have the right to create spaciousness within yourself --- this is not well understood in Western cultures, it is better understood in Buddhist cultures and known as emptiness, open space, . . . 


You have the right to create space in your life --- less clutter, less things, less busyness, less doing --- simplifying your life/space.



You have the right to practice saying NO to anything and anybody that obstructs or prevents you from being able to practice. 


You have the right to say NO to whatever contributes to you being disembodied or less than fully embodied.


You have the right to say NO to anything and anybody that obstructs or prevents you from being able to practice being embodied.   


You have the right to say NO to anything and anybody that obstructs or prevents you from feeling good and embodying well-being.    


You have the right to say NO to anything and anybody that obstructs or prevents you from practicing well-being exercises.   



You have the right to practice STOPPING what you are doing in your practice whenever your breathing becomes restricted or you tense up.


You have the right to STOP what you are doing in your practice when your breathing becomes restricted or you are tensing up.


You have the right to STOP what you are doing while you are practicing your somatic exercises --- this is practicing basic self-regulation. Self-regulation is important learning-for-life. For example - when your breathing becomes restricted during your daily life you are more likely to stop what you are doing so as to be able to re-establish a more wholesome quality of breathing. Or when you become aware of tensing up in your body in certain situations in your daily life.


You have the right to STOP what you are doing in your practice when your breathing becomes restricted or you are tensing up.

You have the right to STOP your practice and rest when you need to.

You have the right to STOP your practice and not practice as you feel.



You have the right to practice complaining whenever you are in pain during your practice and in your daily life.


You have the right to complain whenever your body is in pain during your practice and in your daily life --- when it pains - complain.



You have the right to practice expressing your feelings of pleasure and pain as you practice.


You have the right to practice expressing your feelings of pleasure and enjoyment.



You have the right to practice expressing any sounds you like as a way of releasing your feelings and emotions in a conscious, healthy and playful way.


You have the right to practice  participate in a practice that is different than most classes that are around, those that don’t make, encourage or allow participants to spontaneously express themselves through sound --- this is an important distinction.



You have the right to practice being creative, innovative and inventive with your practice.


You have the right to practice being creative and innovative with the way you exercise and develop your practice.


You have the right to be your own teacher and find things out through personal exploration, experimentation and personal experience.


You have the right to make things up as you go along - be spontaneous, outrageous, silly, dramatic, and non-rational. 


You have the right to make things up as you go along - be spontaneous, outrageous, silly, dramatic, non-rational, and inventive.  


You have the right to make things up as you go along--- finding out what works for you on a particular day.



You have the right to practice being yourself and have a separate identity as a person who has a personal practice.


You have the right to practice being who and how you want to be and if that involves doing some unusual exercise practices that some people have difficulty with then that is their problem --- you are free to do your thing regardless. 



You have the right to practice  yawning when you feel the impulse to yawn.


You have the right to explore yawning, practice yawning, to re-establish the impulse to yawn



You have the right to practice stretching when you feel the impulse to stretch.


You have the right to spontaneously stretch - when you feel the impulse to stretch



You have the right to practice forging, moving slowly and steadily, following your own path and practice.



You have the right to practice gradually over your lifetime gradually developing the skill & art of practicing being a body



You have the right to practice resting when you need to rest.


You have the right to rest as part of your lifestyle



You have the right to practice not knowing what you are doing, or where you are going, staying open and receptive to your process of learning and self-discovery.



You have the right to practice being your own compass, trusting your inner guide, . . .



You have the right to practice discovering your own way of exercising and practicing.



You have the right to practice being open to your creative flow, experimenting, finding what works, . . .



You have the right to practice valuing your practice regardless of what others value or devalue, understand or misunderstand about what you are doing.



You have the right to practice having your sense of of what is valuable for you



You have the right to practice not having to defend your right to practice.



You have the right to practice feeling your freedom to practice



You have the right to practice being more intimate and nurturing with yourself.



You have the right to practice getting more deeply in touch with yourself



You have the right to practice judging your own behaviour and be responsible for it as you create and develop your personal practice in your lifetime.


You have the right to



You have the right to practice being treated as capable of developing and maintaining a personal practice



You have the right to



You have the right to practice being the final judge of your feelings and accept
them as legitimate - as you create your own personal practice.



You have the right to



You have the right to practice making mistakes and be responsible for your practice. 



You have the right to



You have the right to practice being treated with respect for practicing self-care skills and enhancing your personal well-being and happiness.


You have the right to


You have the right to practice having your own opinions and convictions regarding your life, your world, other people and your personal practice.


You have the right to


You have the right to practice privately, to be alone and practice to your hearts content.


You have the right to


You have the right to practice changing your mind or change a situation or change your practice at any time.


You have the right to


You have the right to practice protesting unfair treatment or criticism related to you or another having a personal practice.


You have the right to


You have the right to practice standing up for yourself and your right to practice.


You have the right to


You have the right to ask for clarification, whenever you need to, making things easier and clearer for you --- improving your personal practice. 


You have the right to


You have the right to practice asking for guidelines from others who can help you.


You have the right to


You have the right to practice ignoring the advice of others and find your own way through the journey of your personal practice.


You have the right to


You have the right to practice negotiating for change so you can practice at different times, practice more often and for longer, changing your lifestyle and your practice whenever you feel you need to.


You have the right to


You have the right to practice asking for help or emotional support when you need to as your practice deepens.


You have the right to


You have the right to practice feel and express pain and anger as frustrations and difficulties naturally emerge in your personal journey and practice.


You have the right to



You have the right to practice saying, "I will think about it and get back to you." and move on --- doing what you have to do to maintain your ground and your personal practice.


You have the right to



You have the right to practice being proud of your accomplishments that you achieve as a consequence of having a personal practice.


You have the right to


You have the right to practice being alone, even if others would prefer your company, treating your practice as "sacred time". 


You have the right to


You have the right to practice protecting and valuing your need to practice to the point of excluding others so you can freely practice.


You have the right to


You have the right to practice not having to justify yourself to others for practicing.


You have the right to


You have the right to practice putting yourself first sometimes and do whatever you need to do --- stretch, yawn, dance, shake, laugh, go for a walk or take a nap.


You have the right to


You have the right to practice not taking responsibility for someone else's problems and get on with what you need to do for yourself and practice.


You have the right to


You have the right to practice choosing not to respond to a situation and maintain your own ground, keep your focus and move on.


You have the right to


You have the right to practice not having to anticipate others' needs and wishes, 

you have the right to take responsibility for yourself, doing what you need to do, being contented with your level of self-care now.


You have the right to








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